Position:
Associate Professor
Division:
Endocrinology
Address:
DHCC #10211
2775 Laurel Street, 10th FLoor
Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1M9
Canada
Research Interests:
  • Cultural competency education in physician training
  • Diabetes prevention and control
  • Diabetes self-management interventions in community-based settings
  • Health promotion and disease prevention in medically underserved communities
  • Racial and ethnic health and health care disparities

 

 

Research Sumary:

Over the past 11 years, I have developed a significant, independently funded, program of research on chronic illness prevention and control among ethnic minority and medically underserved communities. I have served as a Principal Investigator on 5 NIH grants and 3 foundation grants focused on the development, implementation, and evaluation of innovative models for long-term chronic illness management.

In February 2003, I secured an NIH-sponsored pilot grant to examine the feasibility of an empowerment-based, culturally tailored, and professional-led, diabetes self-management support (DSMS) intervention designed to sustain and/or improve long-term diabetes-related health outcomes among African-American adults with type 2 diabetes (Lifelong Management intervention). Results found that participation in the Lifelong Management intervention was associated with improvements in body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and self-care behaviors. In July 2005, I received a 5-year NIH-sponsored K23 career development award to investigate whether health gains achieved from short-term diabetes self-management education (DSME) would be sustained and/or improved following participation in the 24-month Lifelong Management intervention. At the end of a 6-month DSME period, participants made signficant improvements in clinical (diastolic blood pressure and serum cholesterol,) and self-care (healthy diet, blood glucose monitoring, foot exams) outcomes. Not only were improvements sustained post- 24-month Lifelong Management intervention, but additional self-care and psychosocial improvements (quality of lifes) emerged. Findings suggest that an empowerment-based, professional-led DSMS model can sustain or improve health gains achieved from short-term DSME. In July 2008, I received a grant sponsored by the International Diabetes Federation to develop, implement, and evaluate a program training peers to faciliate the Lifelong Management intervention. The peer leader training program recruited 8 African-American adults and equipped them with communication skills, empowerment-based facilitation strategies, and behavior change techniques. All participants met the pre-established competencies post- training. Results demonstrated that it is feasibile to train and graudate peer leaders with the necessary skills set to facilitate the Lifelong Management intervention. In February 2009, I received grant sponsored by the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation to conduct a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of our Peer-led Lifelong Management intervention for African-American and Spanish-speaking Latino adults with type 2 diabetes in community-based and clinic-based settings, respsetively. In December 2010, I received an NIH-sponsored grant to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally tailored, church-based, diabetes prevention program delivered by peers (Lifelong Prevention intervention). We recruited six African-American adults who successfully graduated from the 8-hour peer lifestyle coach (PLC) training program. In May 2011, I received a grant from the Vancouver General Hospital – University of British Columbia hospital foundation to conducte a RCT of the Lifelong Management intervention culturally tailored for Punjabi-speaking South Asian Canadians with type 2 diabetes. This study is currently underway. In August 2011, I received an NIH-sponsored R34 grant to conduct a cluster RCT investigating the impact of a peer-led and church-based DSMS intervention for African-American adults with type 2 diabetes compared to a controlled condition. In Jaunary 2012, I was awarded a Vancouver Foundation grant: Prevention Matters: reducing the diabetes burden in the South Asian community and In August 2013, I was awarded a grant from Sun-Life to design “A Virtual Fitness Center for South Asian adults at risk for or diagnosed with diabetes.”

 

Education:
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA Psychology, 1994, A.B.
University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA Clinical Psychology, 1999, PhD
Recent Publications:
  • Boyd EA, Gutierrez JR, Fink RJ, Eaman E, Tang TS. Cultural competency training in undergraduate medical education: strategies for including lesbian, gay, and bisexual health concerns. Annals of Behavioral Science and Medical Education 12:65-71, 2006.
  • Tang TS, Funnell MM, Anderson RM. Group education strategies for diabetes self-management.  Diabetes Spectrum 19:99-105, 2006.
  • Bole A, Tang TS. Narrative Medicine: The case for a curriculum in medical education. Annals of Behavioral Science and Medical Education 13:10-15, 2007.
  • Funnell MM, Tang TS, Anderson RM. From DSME to DSMS: Developing empowerment-based diabetes self-management support. Diabetes Spectrum 20:221-226, 2007.
  • Tang TS, White CB, Haftel HM, Poszywak KK, Bozynski MA. Evaluating medical students’ cross-cultural communication skills. Annals of Behavioral Science and Medical Education 13:73-77, 2007.
  • Fitzgerald JT, Stansfield RB, Tang TS, Oh MF, Frohna AZ, Armbruster BA, Gruppen LD, Anderson RM. Patient and provider perceptions of diabetes: measuring and evaluating differences. Patient Education and Counseling 70:118-125, 2008.
  • Li DL, Gao Y, Mullan P, Tang TS, Gruppen L. Optional double major program will broaden medical students’ knowledge base.  Chinese Journal of Medical Education 2008;28: 35-40.
  • Ramirez D, Engel KG, Tang TS. Language interpreter utilization in the emergency department setting: a clinical review.  Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 19:352-361, 2008.
  • Roy B, Tang TS. Beliefs and predictors of cervical cancer screening among women attending a women’s health clinic in Kolkata, India. Journal of Cancer Education 2008;23: 23-9.
  • Tang TS, Brown MB, Funnell MM, Anderson RM. Social support, quality of life, and self-care behaviors among African Americans with type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Educator 34:266-276, 2008.
  • Tang TS, Fitzgerald JT, Stansfield B, Oh M, Anderson RM. Patient-provider perceptions of diabetes and its impact on self-management: a comparison of African-American and Caucasian patients. Diabetic Medicine 25:341-8, 2008.
  • Anderson RM, Funnell MM, Fitzgerald JT, Oh M, Aikens J, Tang TS. Evaluating the efficacy of an empowerment-based self-management consultant intervention : results of a two-year randomized controlled trial. Therapeutic Patient Education 2009;1: 3-11.
  • Tang TS, Patterson S, Roubidoux M, Duan L. Women’s mammography experience and its impact  on screening adherence.  Psycho-oncology 2009;18: 727-34.
  • Tang TS, Skye E. When patients decline medical student participation. The preceptors’ perspective.  Advances in Health Sciences Education 2009; 14:645-9.
  • Tang TS, Skye E. Who gets “kicked out” of the exam room?  Factors associated with patient refusal of medical student participation. Teaching and Learning in Medicine 2009;21: 1-7.
  • Tang TS, Skye E.I. Increasing patients’ acceptance of medical student participation: using interactive theatre for faculty development. Teaching and Learning in Medicine 2009;21: 195-200.
  • Attar MA, Hernandez ME, Mullan PB, Tang TS, Haftel H. Pediatric Residents’ Competency in communicating bad news and eliciting spiritual needs: Development and evaluation of a skill-based curriculum.  Journal of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine 2010;3:177-85.
  • Tang TS, Funnell MM, Brown MBB, Kurlander JE. Supporting ongoing self-management in “real world” settings: An empowerment-based intervention. Patient Education and Counseling 2010;79:178-84.
  • Tang TS, Funnell MM, Gillard M, Nwankwo N, Heisler, M. The development of a pilot training program for peer leaders in diabetes: Process and content. Diabetes Educator (in press).
  • Tang TS, Ayala GX, Cherrington A, Rana G. A review of volunteer-based peer support interventions in diabetes. Diabetes Spectrum 2011;24:85-98.
  • Tang TS, Funnell MM, Gillard M, Nwankwo R, Heisler, M. Training peers to provide ongoing diabetes self-management support (DSMS): Results from a pilot study. Patient Education and Counseling 2011;85:160-8.
  • Tang TS, Funnell MM, Gillard ML, Nwankwo R, Heisler M. The development of a pilot training program for peer leaders in diabetes. The Diabetes Educator 2011; 37:67-77.
  • Tang TS, Funnell MM, Noorulla S, Oh M, Brown MB. Sustaining short-term improvements over the long-term: Results from a 2-year diabetes self-management support (DSMS) intervention. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 2011;95:85-92.
Awards & Recognition:
  • Distinguished Fellow, Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research (OBSSR), National Institutes of Health, The Ninth Annual Summer Institute on Randomized Clinical Trials Involving Behavioral Interventions. July 12-24, 2009
  • William N. Hubbard, Jr., Endowed Fellowship (Annual award), University of Michigan, 2003
  • William N. Hubbard, Jr., Endowed Fellowship (Annual award), University of Michigan, 2002
  • Jeffrey Tanaka Memorial Dissertation Award – Honorable Mention Committee on Ethnic Minority Affairs, Association of Women in Psychology, 1999
  • Women of Color Psychology Award, Association of Women in Psychology, 1997
  • Graduate Research Scholarship Nominee, American Psychological Foundation, 1997
  • Dean’s List, Duke University, 1992-1994

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